Women and Information Technology: Research on Underrepresentation

Front Cover
Mit Press, Sep 30, 2008 - Computers - 500 pages
0 Reviews
Computing remains a heavily male-dominated field even after twenty-five years of extensive efforts to promote female participation. The contributors to Women and Information Technology look at reasons for the persistent gender imbalance in computing and explore some strategies intended to reverse the downward trend. The studies included are rigorous social science investigations; they rely on empirical evidence—not rhetoric, hunches, folk wisdom, or off-the-cuff speculation about supposed innate differences between men and women.

Taking advantage of the recent surge in research in this area, the editors present the latest findings of both qualitative and quantitative studies. Each section begins with an overview of the literature on current research in the field, followed by individual studies. The first section investigates the relationship between gender and information technology among preteens and adolescents, with each study considering what could lead girls' interest in computing to diverge from boys'; the second section, on higher education, includes a nationwide study of computing programs and a cross-national comparison of computing education; the final section, on pathways into the IT workforce, considers both traditional and nontraditional paths to computing careers.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.


The State of Research on Girls and IT
Young Adults Decisions to Pursue
Gender and High School Computer Science

10 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

J. McGrath Cohoon is Assistant Professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia. She is also a Senior Research Scientist at the National Center for Women and Information Technology.

Bibliographic information