The History of New Jersey: From Its Discovery by Europeans, to the Adoption of the Federal Constitution

Front Cover
D. Fenton, 1834 - New Jersey - 339 pages
 

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 156 - ... for contributing their proportion to the common defence (such proportion to be raised under the authority of the general court or general assembly of such province or colony, and disposable by Parliament), and shall engage to make provision also for the support of the civil government and the administration of justice...
Page 135 - That the only representatives of the people of these colonies are persons chosen therein by themselves, and that no taxes ever have been, or can be constitutionally imposed on them, but by their respective legislatures.
Page 192 - DO, in the name and by the authority of the good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these united colonies, are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states ; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connexion between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved...
Page 322 - That, in the opinion of Congress, it is expedient that, on the second Monday in May next, a convention of delegates who shall have been appointed by the several states, be held at Philadelphia, for the sole and express purpose of revising the articles of confederation, and reporting to Congress, and the several legislatures, such...
Page 321 - Union, at a time and place to be agreed on, to take into consideration the trade of the United States ; to examine the relative situation and trade of the said States; to consider how far a uniform system in their commercial regulations may be necessary to their common interest and their permanent harmony...
Page 180 - That there shall be no establishment of any one religious sect in this province in preference to another ; and that no protestant inhabitant of this colony shall be denied the enjoyment of any civil right, merely on account of his religious principles...
Page 163 - We are reduced to the alternative of choosing an unconditional submission to the tyranny of irritated ministers, or resistance by force. The latter is our choice. We. have counted the cost of this contest, and find nothing so dreadful as voluntary slavery.
Page 323 - RESOLVED, That the preceding Constitution be laid before the United States, in Congress assembled, and that it is the opinion of this Convention, that it should afterwards be submitted to a Convention of Delegates, chosen in each State by the people thereof, under the recommendation of its Legislature, for their assent and ratification...
Page 311 - I most devoutly wish, that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy, as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 162 - In our own native land, in defence of the freedom that is our birthright, and which we ever enjoyed till the late violation of it — for the protection of our property, acquired solely by the honest industry of our fore-fathers and ourselves, against violence actually offered, we have taken up arms. We shall lay them down when hostilities shall cease on the part of the aggressors, and all danger of their being renewed shall be removed, and not before.

Bibliographic information