The Englishman in Kansas: Or, Squatter Life and Border Warfare

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Miller, 1857 - History - 388 pages
 

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Page 328 - From the conclusion of this war we shall be going down hill. It will not then be necessary to resort every moment to the people for support. They will be forgotten, therefore, and their rights disregarded. They will forget themselves, but in the sole faculty of making money, and will never think of uniting to effect a due respect for their rights.
Page 80 - To those who have qualms of conscience as to violating laws, State or National, the time has come when such impositions must be disregarded, as your rights and property are in danger ; and I advise you, one and all, to enter every election district in Kansas, in defiance of Reeder and his vile myrmidons, and vote at the point of the bowie-knife and revolver. Neither give nor take quarter, as our cause demands it. It is enough that the slaveholding interest wills it, from which there is no appeal.
Page 25 - Proslavery men, law and order men, strike for your altars ! strike for your firesides! strike for your rights! sound the bugle of war over the length and breadth of the land, and leave not an abolitionist in the territory to relate their treacherous and contaminating deeds. Strike your piercing rifle-balls and your glittering steel to their black and poisonous hearts! Let the war cry never cease in Kansas again, until our territory is wrested of the last vestige of abolitionism.
Page 86 - ... at the first election, and shall be eligible to any office within the said territory; but the qualifications of voters...
Page 2 - ... of the Territory. Whatever irregularities may have occurred in the elections, it seems too late now to raise that question. At all events it is a question as to which neither now, nor at any previous time, has the least possible legal authority been possessed by the President of the United States. For all present purposes the legislative body, thus constituted and elected, was the legitimate assembly of the Territory.
Page 286 - Those men came to the Wakarusa camp to fight ; they did not ask peace : it was war — war to the knife. They would come ; it was impossible to prevent them. What, then, was my policy ? Certainly this : to mitigate an evil which it was impossible to suppress, by bringing under military control these irregular and excited forces. This was only to be accomplished by permitting...
Page 72 - If any free person, by speaking or writing, assert or maintain that persons have not the right to hold slaves in this territory...
Page 80 - I tell you to mark every scoundrel among you that is the least tainted with free-soilism or abolitionism, and exterminate him. Neither give nor take quarter from the rascals. I propose to mark them in this house, and on the present occasion, so you may crush them out.
Page 237 - The sun has set for the last time upon the, guaranteed and certain liberties of all the unsettled and unorganized portions of the American continent that lie within the jurisdiction of the United States. To-morrow's sun will rise in dim eclipse over them.
Page 328 - ... moment to the people for support. They will be forgotten, therefore, and their rights disregarded. They will forget themselves, but in the sole faculty of making money, and will never think of uniting to effect a due respect for their rights. The shackles, therefore, which shall not be knocked off at the conclusion of this war, will remain on us long, will be made heavier and heavier, till our rights shall revive or expire in a convulsion.

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