Two Treatises of Government

Front Cover
Whitmore and Fenn and C. Brown, 1821 - Liberty - 401 pages
Two Treatises of Government by John Locke. Suggested reading for Randolph High School Summer Reading.
 

Contents

I
1
II
5
III
15
IV
23
V
48
VI
55
VII
83
VIII
90
XVI
208
XVII
230
XVIII
252
XIX
269
XX
294
XXI
300
XXII
301
XXIII
313

IX
94
X
116
XI
119
XII
187
XIII
189
XIV
200
XV
205
XXIV
316
XXV
327
XXVI
336
XXVII
340
XXVIII
358
XXIX
360
XXX
370

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Page 26 - And God made the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind: and God saw that it was good.
Page 269 - MEN being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of ' this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent.
Page 189 - To understand political power right, and derive it from its original, we must consider, what state all men are naturally in, and that is, a state of perfect freedom to order their actions, and dispose of their possessions and persons, as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of nature, without asking leave, or depending upon the will of any other man.
Page 189 - A state also of equality, wherein all the power and jurisdiction is reciprocal, no one having more than another; there being nothing more evident than that creatures of the same species and rank, promiscuously born to all the same advantages of nature and the use of the same faculties, should also be equal one amongst another without subordination or subjection...
Page 160 - These are the families of the sons of Noah, after their generations, in their nations: and by these were the nations divided in the earth after the flood.
Page 144 - Wherefore she said unto Abraham, Cast out this bondwoman and her son: for the son of this bondwoman shall not be heir with my son, even with Isaac.
Page 30 - Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet : All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field ; The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.
Page 316 - ... there can be but one supreme power, which is the legislative, to which all the rest are and must be subordinate ; yet the legislative being only a fiduciary power to act for certain ends, there remains still " in the people a supreme power to remove or alter the legislative," when they find the legislative act contrary to the trust reposed in them...
Page 299 - And so whoever has the legislative or supreme power of any commonwealth, is bound to govern by established standing laws, promulgated and known to the people, and not by extemporary decrees; by indifferent and upright judges, who are to decide controversies by those laws; and to employ the force of the community at home, only in the execution of such laws; or abroad to prevent or redress foreign injuries, and secure the community from inroads and invasion. And all this to be directed to no other...
Page 189 - Political power, then, I take to be a right of making laws with penalties of death, and consequently all less penalties, for the regulating and preserving of property...

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