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" Pleased as we are with the possession, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which it was acquired, as if fearful of some defect in our title ; or at least we rest satisfied with the decision of the laws in our favour, without examining the reason... "
Principles of Political Economy - Page 30
by George Poulett Scrope - 1833 - 457 pages
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The Abolition of Inheritance

Harlan Eugene Read - Decedents' estates - 1918 - 360 pages
...the trouble to consider the original foundation of this right. Pleased as we are with the possession, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which...acquired, as if fearful of some defect in our title ; human rights, the document adds authority to natural right and confirms it. If the law is wrong,...
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Proceedings of the Stanford Conference on Business Education

Stanford University. Graduate School of Business - Business education - 1926 - 232 pages
...private property of their own in which they can be interested. I paraphrase Blackstone when I say, Pleased as we are with the possession of property, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which we have acquired it, as if fearful of some defect in our title. We obtain and hold our property, both...
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The Quest for Justice: Aboriginal Peoples and Aboriginal Rights

Menno Boldt, J. Anthony Long, Leroy Little Bear - Social Science - 1985 - 424 pages
...trouble to consider the origin and foundation of this right. Pleased as we are with the possession, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which...defect in our title; or at best, we rest satisfied with thedecision ofthelawsin our favour, without examining the reason or authority upon which those laws...
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Essays in the Public Philosophy

Walter Lippmann - 189 pages
...would limit their absolute rights. foreboding, he wrote that "Pleased as we are with the possession, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which...acquired, as if fearful of some defect in our title ... not caring to reflect that (accurately and strictly speaking) there is no foundation in nature...
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Policy for Land: Law and Ethics

Lynton Keith Caldwell, Kristin Sharon Shrader-Frechette - Political Science - 1993 - 356 pages
...same point. He wrote: Pleased as we are with the possession [of land], we seem afraid to look back on the means by which it was acquired, as if fearful of some defect in our title . . . not caring to reflect that, accurately and strictly speaking, there is no foundation in nature...
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The Myth of Property: Toward an Egalitarian Theory of Ownership

John Christman - Philosophy - 1994 - 240 pages
...the whole apparatus is quite puzzling. As Blackstone put it, [p]leased as we are with the possession, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which...acquired, as if fearful of some defect in our title;. .. not caring to reflect that.. . there is no foundation in nature or in natural law, why a set of...
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Classical Foundations of Liberty and Property

Richard Allen Epstein - Law - 2000 - 438 pages
...confider the original and foundation of this right. Pleafed as we are with the puflcfl'ion, we feem afraid to look back to the means by which it was acquired, as if fearful of fome defecl in our title ; or at beft we reft fatisfied with the decifion of the laws in our favour,...
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A Popular and Practical Introduction to Law Studies: And to Every Department ...

Samuel Warren, Thomas W. Clerke - Law - 2003 - 674 pages
...Pleased as we are with the possession" says Blackstone [ii. Comm.p. 2] speaking of the origin and growth of property, " we seem afraid to look back to the...acquired — as if fearful of some defect in our title !" lot) The three grand divisions of the Legal Profession, as already intimated in this chapter, are...
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The Fugitive's Properties: Law and the Poetics of Possession

Stephen M. Best - Literary Criticism - 2010 - 376 pages
...consider the original and foundation of this right [in property]. Pleased as we are with the possession, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which...was acquired, as if fearful of some defect in our tide; or at best we rest satisfied with the decision of the laws in our favour, without examining the...
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Engendering Legitimacy: Law, Property, and Early Eighteenth-century Fiction

Susan Glover - History - 2006 - 231 pages
...trouble to consider the original and foundation of this right. Pleased as we are with the possession, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which it was acquired. . . . not caring to reflect that (accurately and strictly speaking) there is no foundation in nature...
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