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" Pleased as we are with the possession, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which it was acquired, as if fearful of some defect in our title ; or at least we rest satisfied with the decision of the laws in our favour, without examining the reason... "
Principles of Political Economy - Page 30
by George Poulett Scrope - 1833 - 457 pages
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The Human Right to Property

Theo R. G. van Banning - Law - 2002 - 469 pages
...consider the original and foundation of this right [of property] . Pleased as we are with the possession, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which...fearful of some defect in our title; or at best we are satisfied with the decision of the laws in our favour, without examining the reason or authority...
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Journal, Volumes 4-6

Knights of Labor - Labor - 1883
..." Blackstone's Commentaries on the English Law": Pleased as they are with the possession [of land], we seem afraid to look back to the means by which...acquired, as if fearful of some defect in our title. * * * * We think it enough that our title is derived by the grant of the former proprietor by descent...
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The Belfast Queen's College Calendar

Queen's University of Belfast - Education, Higher - 1875
...trouble to consider the original and foundation of this right. Pleased as we are with the possession, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which...was acquired, as if fearful of some defect in our title.—BLACKSTONE. III.—1. Name the authors of the following plays, and state what classical plays...
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Proceedings of the Stanford Conference on Business Education

Stanford University. Graduate School of Business - Business education - 1926 - 228 pages
...private property of their own in which they can be interested. I paraphrase Blackstone when I say, Pleased as we are with the possession of property, we seem afraid to look back to the means by which we have acquired it, as if fearful of some defect in our title. We obtain and hold our property, both...
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